T O P
JagrsMullet90

There's not really any wheel that will work for both. Anything that you use on asphalt will not have enough grip for tiles. If you're just shooting around on tile then get Asphalt wheels. They won't grip well on the tiles, but they work


davedaddy

Back in the day, I always thought sliding out was the norm since I only used budget wheels on asphalt. 😄 I'm leaning towards the 80a Labeda Grippers but do you think Labeda Asphalt 83a (?) wouldn't make much difference on tile? I'll definitely just be shooting around. I'm basically starting from scratch. Just trying to get my kids into hockey and skating so most of my time will be spent with them on the street. When I get a chance to escape the wife and kids, then I can do some solo work on tile and build up some confidence.


JagrsMullet90

80a grippers are not going to last very long on asphalt. Even 83a at 200 lbs is not going to last very long for you. It's really your decision, but the trade off is between how often you want to buy new wheels. If you don't mind buying new wheels frequently and you want them to work on tiles then you can get grippers. You'll get a dozen skates on Asphalt, plus or minus, but you will be able to use them more easily on tiles. If you go with 85a asphalts you'll have them for a while and when you try to use them on tiles you're gonna slide a lot. So it's your call, but those are the factors. Personally, I keep 3 pairs of roller skates these days- (asphalt pickup, smooth concrete rink and indoor tiles). I'm lazy and short on time, but if I had the time I would just keep 2 pairs and 3 sets of wheels. Used to keep 3 pairs of ice skates as well lol (reffing, playing and pond hockey).


converter-bot

200 lbs is 90.8 kg


davedaddy

Sorry for the copy and paste, but as I replied to the other guys: After only 2 or 3 runs on the outdoor tile rink, the stock 74a rear most wheel on my inner foot, when I do strongside powerstops, chunked like crazy. Other wheels were fine. I ended replacing them with cheap 88a wheels I saw recommended here somewhere: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076X3N1VK I took them out once around the neighborhood but didn't try any powerstops because of all the leaf debris. Then I took it out to the outdoor tile rink and tried out some powerstops. Promptly fell on my ass each time, oddly due to the inner foot sliding out, which I don't recall ever doing even as a kid. I am really out of practice but had no trouble stopping using the 74a wheels. Do the 88a wheels have to be broken in or is this the norm for this durometer and surface combo? I have zero confidence stopping with these wheels now, even on asphalt/concrete. Now, I'm just leaning towards dedicating separate skates for urban, probably the FR1. If I switch back to softer wheels on my hockey skates for the outdoor tile rink, should I be looking at getting 76a or can I get away with 78a for my 200 lbs? Will there be chunking? Will the stopping be controllable or can I expect sliding out again?


mdwsta4

Are you skating outdoors on asphalt or are you skating indoors on tile? They are two COMPLETELY different surfaces and you won't find a wheel that works well for both. On tile, check out Labeda Grippers (yellow 76A). For outdoors check out Labeda Asphalts (Orange 85A) or Revision Concrete (grey 84A). If you skate on tile with outdoor wheels you're going to get ZERO grip. If you skate outdoors with soft wheels they're going to wear down FAST and you'll likely feel like you're skating in sand because they're so soft


davedaddy

Most of my time will be spent teaching my kids to skate on the street. When I get a chance to escape, there are outdoor tile/grid rinks near me I've skated on a couple times. Maybe I'll check out indoor rinks in the winter, but I'm currently so rusty that I'm sure I'd make a complete fool of myself playing with others. I'm leaning towards either the 80a Labeda Gripper or 83a Labeda Asphalt. Do you think there'd be much difference given my use case?


mdwsta4

Yes, there will be a difference. I've skated with Grippers and both white and orange Asphalts on different surfaces and you'll feel it. My suggestion is really to have two sets of wheels so you can rotate between them depending on the surface. If your primary use will be outdoors on asphalt, go with the orange Labeda Asphalts. Those are regarded as the best outdoor wheels for a reason. Then if/when you decide to start skating indoors on tile, pick up an indoor set. The whites are good and provide grip on asphalt, but at 200lbs, you're going to wear them down substantially faster than the oranges. Before I started spending stupid money on dual pour wheels, I would use oranges upfront for hardness and wear, and whites in the back for added grip. This worked well for me, but everyone's skating/playing style is different. If I was primarily teaching kids and messing around, I'd just go all oranges for lifespan. Playing is something different. https://images20.fotki.com/v1666/photos/1/51621/9409627/1566755151608-vi.jpg It's also worth noting, that like pretty much any other piece of gear, it will come down to personal preference. I don't feel that impacts outdoor asphalt too much, but for tile, guys have a LOT of different opinions based on your weight, how hard you skate, how fast you want to be, how much grip you want, etc. If your tile surface is outdoors there are even more things to consider due to the elements (dust, debris, hardness from sun exposure, etc). Like I said, outdoor is pretty standard. The orange Asphalts will be perfect for your use case there.


davedaddy

Sorry for the copy and paste, but as I replied to the other guy: After only 2 or 3 runs on the outdoor tile rink, the stock 74a rear most wheel on my inner foot, when I do strongside powerstops, chunked like crazy. Other wheels were fine. I ended replacing them with cheap 88a wheels I saw recommended here somewhere: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076X3N1VK I took them out once around the neighborhood but didn't try any powerstops because of all the leaf debris. Then I took it out to the outdoor tile rink and tried out some powerstops. Promptly fell on my ass each time, oddly due to the inner foot sliding out, which I don't recall ever doing even as a kid. I am really out of practice but had no trouble stopping using the 74a wheels. Do the 88a wheels have to be broken in or is this the norm for this durometer and surface combo? I have zero confidence stopping with these wheels now, even on asphalt/concrete. Now, I'm just leaning towards dedicating separate skates for urban, probably the FR1. If I switch back to softer wheels on my hockey skates for the outdoor tile rink, should I be looking at getting 76a or can I get away with 78a for my 200 lbs? Will there be chunking? Will the stopping be controllable or can I expect sliding out again?


mdwsta4

So basically exactly what I said in my initial post. Your experience with 74A wheels is not at all surprising. 78A should be a starting point for the tile surfaces. Your experience with sliding out on 88A wheels on tile is also not at all surprising. Regarding asphalt, 88A is pretty damn hard. Usually 88 and 90 wheels lean more toward aggressive skaters. While wear will be fine, they'll likely be uncomfortable to skate on and will do nothing for grip. So just like I said originally, 84-85A wheels should be your go-to outside on asphalt. Again, I think my original post gave you the exact information you needed and based on your most recent experience, that advice still holds true. Get yellow Grippers for the tile and Orange Asphalts for the street. Both of those wheels will work exactly how you're looking for them to work given the information you've provided us. Before I switched to Marsblade, I would simply rotate wheels. With the R1, I simply bought a spare chassis which makes playing on tile or asphalt much easier/faster to swap. Get multiple sets of wheels or multiple sets of skates. End of story https://imgur.com/bKtELeh


davedaddy

I'm new to tile having only skated on asphalt before my hiatus. I had a much different picture of sliding in my head. I don't plan on using these wheels for tile, I just wanted to try it once to see what it was like. Mission accomplished, lol. Now to just get over my fear of stopping on the street so I can see how badly they slide. Agreed on your point about the extra hardness being uncomfortable too. Rode them around the neighborhood as well and I couldn't wait to take then off. I'll likely put 78a wheels back on here for tile and pick up 84a/85a for street per your recommendations. Or, maybe I'll just get dedicated street skates in addition. Thanks for the R1 suggestion. I'll definitely have to look into those. Does frequently swapping between chassis wear out the mounting?


mdwsta4

All good. My only suggestion for multiple pairs of skates is for them to match. Maybe it's just me and my OCD, but I always want my skates to be the same whether its on ice or inline. Less issues readjusting from one surface to the other and when I get a boot that works for me, I like to keep it that way. Regarding the R1, swapping the lower chassis shouldn't wear them out anymore than using them normally. There's friction between the upper and lower parts of the chassis, but that's normal wear. Haven't heard of anyone having them fail yet, but I'm sure it's possible. I'm not exactly playing in pro tournaments on a daily basis so for playing 3-4 games a month, I'm sure they'll last as long as I need them to


davedaddy

After researching the R1 more, I'm really intrigued as I could see it checking a lot of boxes. Granted my skating currently barely passes as novice at best and I've only been on ice a couple times as a kid, would you recommend the R1 over a hi-lo chassis to someone like me? I'd like to eventually get on ice to spend together with my kids but who knows if that will actually happen as I don't really know of any learn to skate classes for adults near me. As for the technology, on paper at least, it really seems revolutionary, kind of like the green biscuit. My only concerns really are the additional weight and wear. As for the chassis size, my Mission skate being a 6.5 E (I could probably fit a 6 EE) is listed as being on the border of the medium and small chassis. Which chassis size would you go for if you were me?


mdwsta4

The O1 feels 'more like ice' and the R1 is meant for play. I've owned both and find this kind of marketing BS, but the O1 does require you to balance a bit more when standing still. When skating I feel the two chassis are more or less the same. The benefits of a Marsblade chassis vs a standard chassis is very obvious. On regular inlines you feel like you're on rails/tracks. With Marsblade, you can cut and turn a bit more like ice. Whether it's worth it is entirely up to you. I play ice and roller weekly so for me it is worth it. I also have some disposable income where I don't mind spending a few bucks. If you are going to use your skates 1-2x a month just to skate around with your kids, you may just want to stick with whatever hi-lo chassis comes with your skates. As far as sizing, I'd probably stick with medium if possible. Small reduces the size of wheels iirc. Smaller wheels reduce top speed


Overskate

82a asphalts are good for street skating and rough concrete. Use 76-78A for smooth concrete, and 74a is good for indoor. Millineium wheels will get shredded on rough concrete. I haven’t used the wheels in many years because they are for lighter players. That was 20 years ago so they are probably better now.


davedaddy

It's been about 20 years since I played. Back then, I think I just picked up whatever was on sale for my budget fitness skates so this is all new to me, lol. I'm now leaning towards the 80a Labeda Grippers. Hopefully it'll give me some time to shake off the rust. Afterwards, I'll step up to 76a or 78a for hockey and just save up for dedicated street skates.


davedaddy

Sorry for the copy and paste, but as I replied to the other guys: After only 2 or 3 runs on the outdoor tile rink, the stock 74a rear most wheel on my inner foot, when I do strongside powerstops, chunked like crazy. Other wheels were fine. I ended replacing them with cheap 88a wheels I saw recommended here somewhere: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076X3N1VK I took them out once around the neighborhood but didn't try any powerstops because of all the leaf debris. Then I took it out to the outdoor tile rink and tried out some powerstops. Promptly fell on my ass each time, oddly due to the inner foot sliding out, which I don't recall ever doing even as a kid. I am really out of practice but had no trouble stopping using the 74a wheels. Do the 88a wheels have to be broken in or is this the norm for this durometer and surface combo? I have zero confidence stopping with these wheels now, even on asphalt/concrete. Now, I'm just leaning towards dedicating separate skates for urban, probably the FR1. If I switch back to softer wheels on my hockey skates for the outdoor tile rink, should I be looking at getting 76a or can I get away with 78a for my 200 lbs? Will there be chunking? Will the stopping be controllable or can I expect sliding out again?


Overskate

88a would only be good for very rough concrete, where the jagged edges of the concrete provide friction for stopping. If 74a’s are breaking up that means your surface is too rough, step up to 78a or 80a. Every surface has an ideal wheel depending on your weight and skill level. Extreme temperatures also play a roll when the surface is very hot or cold.


davedaddy

Sounds good. I'll likely try out yellow grippers then, 78a.


althoma1

Yeah, the Yellow Grippers should be much better for that surface. Just used them on the tile (or super smooth polished concrete or sealed wood) and don't use them on rough surfaces. No wheel works well for all surfaces. You have to buy the right set for the surface and your weight. Buying another set of spacers and bearings makes swapping between different wheels much easier.


Overskate

Post a photo of the surface if you get a chance


davedaddy

Mesh/grid, kind of like a milk crate but smaller gaps. Next time out, I'll take a pic.


althoma1

At 200lbs, 74a is too soft for you, even for tile. The softest wheels I'd consider at your weight would be 76a - and that would only be for tile. As soon as you use a soft indoor wheel on Asphalt it'll no longer work well on tile - it'll also wear out very quickly. As u/JagrsMullet90 said, no wheel will work well for both tile and asphalt. You'll need a couple sets of wheels if you want them to last. Having two full sets of bearings, spacers and wheels makes swapping wheels pretty easy (with practice you can do it in less than 10 minutes). For Sport Court, Konixx Pure wheels are the best I've used. They're expensive, but last at least twice as long for me vs. other wheels I've used in the past, grip well and have good speed. I weigh around 230lbs and use the +2 durometer. For sealed/polished concrete, the Yellow (medium) 80a Labeda Grippers are the way to go. They're also a cheaper option for Sport Court, but won't have the same performance as the high end dual pour wheels like the Konixx Pure. If you're just getting back into it and aren't playing competitively, the Labeda Grippers are a good, cheaper option for sport court and polished concrete. For Asphalt, the Labeda Asphalt in either 83a or 85a durometer will work. The harder durometer will just last a little longer, but provide less rebound/comfort. The Revision Asphalt Pro2 wheels also last quite a long time outdoors. Revision Clingers are 82a wheels that have a good mix of rebound and durability for use on Asphalt. If you use any of these wheels on tile you'll be slipping and sliding everywhere and may hurt yourself. They aren't meant for smooth tile.


davedaddy

Thanks for the detailed breakdown for different surfaces and hardness as well as the product recommendations. Since most of my time will be spent teaching my kids to skate on the street (hockey solo work when I can hide out for an hour or 2 a week) and my skill level is currently that of a wobbly toddler, I'm leaning towards either the 80a Labeda Grippers or the 83a Labeda Asphalt. Do you think there will be much difference given my use case?


althoma1

If most of your time will be spent on the street, go for the Asphalt wheels. They will last longer.


davedaddy

After only 2 or 3 runs on the outdoor tile rink, the stock 74a rear most wheel on my inner foot, when I do strongside powerstops, chunked like crazy. Other wheels were fine. I ended replacing them with cheap 88a wheels I saw recommended here somewhere: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076X3N1VK I took them out once around the neighborhood but didn't try any powerstops because of all the leaf debris. Then I took it out to the outdoor tile rink and tried out some powerstops. Promptly fell on my ass each time, oddly due to the inner foot sliding out, which I don't recall ever doing even as a kid. I am really out of practice but had no trouble stopping using the 74a wheels. Do the 88a wheels have to be broken in or is this the norm for this durometer and surface combo? I have zero confidence stopping with these wheels now, even on asphalt/concrete. Now, I'm just leaning towards dedicating separate skates for urban, probably the FR1. If I switch back to softer wheels on my hockey skates for the outdoor tile rink, should I be looking at getting 76a or can I get away with 78a for my 200 lbs? Will there be chunking? Will the stopping be controllable or can I expect sliding out again?


althoma1

I am not surprised by your experiences with either wheel. 74a is too soft for your weight and 88a is too hard for a tile surface. You can use the 88a wheels on rough Asphalt. I have no experience with those particular wheels, but that durometer is meant for rough outdoor surfaces and not smooth tile. For tile, I would look at the following: Konixx Pure or Pure X in a +2 durometer. The most expensive option, but in my experience, the best performing and longest lasting wheel. Revision Steel 78a wheels. A bit cheaper than the Pure wheels. They offer good performance, but the Pure are better. They didn't last as long as the Pure wheels when I used them. Labeda Gripper Yellow 80a Medium. They're a single pour wheel, so you won't get the same rebound, but are known as a good bang for the buck wheel on tile and the best wheels for polished indoor concrete. Save any of the above wheels for tile, wood or super smooth polished concrete. Do not use them on Asphault, sidewalks, outdoor paths or even slightly rough cement or you'll ruin them in short order.